Motor Auctions – Bagging a Bargain

Buying a car at a motor auction can be a great way to find a bargain, but you should make sure that you do your homework first. Before you visit a motor auction with the intention of buying, you should go along to a live auction to learn about the way the bidding system works and to understand how an auction functions. While you may well leave with the car that you want, you need to be aware that you will be competing against other buyers. You might want to line up a number of potentials, just in case your first choice gets snapped up by somebody else.

Picking the right auction to go to and the right time to visit are important elements to make sure that you get the best deal. A quick online search will help you to identify the various motor auctions on offer in your area. Take a look around a few websites for local auction houses and you may even find that they offer you the opportunity to look at the cars that they have due for sale in their next live auction.

You might want to search for a general auction or a specialist sale if you are looking for a specific type of vehicle. In terms of timing, try to avoid school holidays and weekends, as they will be packed full of private buyers also looking for a great bargain. Evening auctions can also be busy, so if possible try to attend a daytime auction during the week.

Another important thing that you should do before attending a motor auction is to have a good think about what car you want to buy. Think about the size of car that you’re looking for, including the engine size, and try to narrow your choice down before you attend the motor auction. Once you get there, you may be overwhelmed by the choice – having a clear idea in your mind is the best way to avoid temptation and stay focused. You don’t want to end up bringing home a car that isn’t really fit purpose.

You also need to decide how much money you want to spend and how much you think that the car you’re interested in is really worth. Auctions are a fast paced and exciting environment, so it’s important that you don’t let yourself get carried away or you could end up driving home in a car that isn’t worth what you paid for it.

Turn up to the motor auction with plenty of time to have a good look around. Although you won’t be able to test drive a car, by having a good look around you’ll get an idea of how the car has been treated. Check over the bodywork for damage and also have a look at the condition of the interior. If the body work panels don’t line up properly, there’s a fair chance that the car has been involved in an accident – in which case it’s probably a good idea to steer clear.

Perhaps one of the most important things to understand is that you have no recourse if there’s an issue with the car once you have purchased. Most motor auctions will give you an hour after the sale is completed to raise any cause for concern. If you believe that any details on the entry form or in the catalogue are incorrect, you may have room for complaint – but it’s a time sensitive matter, so give the car a proper check before you drive away.

Remember that if you’re buying a vehicle at auction, you will be competing against dealers with plenty of experience in the vehicle remarketing industry. As long as you approach the motor auction process in the same way that seasoned auction buyers do, your first motor auction experience should go well.